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Recently, we painted two of our kitchen walls a lovely shade of green. Green is my favorite color. I find it soothing, classy, restful, attractive and evocative of the great outdoors.

Does this mean we now live “green”? Let’s find out.

Earth Day, this year on April 22, is an international celebration of the astounding ability of people to ignore laws of economics, physics and common sense in an effort to pretend their carbon footprint is impossibly dainty. On Saturday, participants are invited to expend fossil fuels and widen their environmental impact by traveling to Washington, D.C., for a rally to demonstrate their massive greenness.

Closer to home, enthusiasts can proclaim their commitment to Gaia by coloring their websites or painting their store fronts green. (Apparently that’s all it takes, so perhaps my kitchen walls qualify.) They’ll sell posters and T-shirts and take donations for everything from planting trees to brainwashing children. Retailers will try to convince customers on the greenness of every product on their shelves, regardless of origin or purpose. I believe the term for this mass hysteria is greenwashing.

Hypocrisy abounds during this yearly event, as was comically illustrated in 2015 by Bill Nye (“the science guy“) who famously tweeted his plans to “[head] down to DC to catch an #EarthDay flight on Air Force One tomorrow with the President. We’re going to #ActOnClimate.” (Wow, Bill, way to go.) Oh, and let’s not forget Al Gore, that paragon of ecological virtue, whose carbon footprint makes that of Manhattan look modest.

Earth Day has become a “cynical, bloated, empty-gesture, 24-hour orgy of self-righteous smugness,” in one person’s memorable words. It’s not that green hypocrisy is anything new; it’s just that on Earth Day, it’s so glaringly obvious. It’s no accident green activists are called watermelons: Green on the outside, red on the inside.

Green living and the green agenda are two entirely different things. Green living is sensible, frugal and an admirable personal choice. The green agenda is something else entirely. It is merely socialism prettily wrapped up in 100 percent recycled wrapping paper, with a communist bow on top and backed up by governmental force. Open that green package, and the gory red insides spill out: the blood of hundreds of millions people who have died from collectivist regimes in the last century.

“[T]here is a great tolerance for the ideas of socialism – a system that has caused more deaths and human misery than all other systems combined,” noted the great Walter Williams.

Learn how to achieve a simple lifestyle without “going green” or joining a monastery. Read Patrice Lewis’ helpful book, “The Simplicity Primer: 365 Ideas for Making Life more Livable”

To those of us with a cynical mindset, it seems we hear more about the hypocrisy around Earth Day than we hear of genuine Earth-friendly actions. Putting a new color on a website or marching on Washington is no more “green” than painting my kitchen walls. There’s way too much “talking the talk” and a lot less “walking the walk” when it comes to green living.

Before lobbying for more government regulations to force people into green-powered socialism, I believe Earth Day activists should put their money where their mouths are – literally. If they want to demonstrate their commitment to Gaia, I challenge them to get their hands dirty by growing and raising their own food. (Maybe they should start with watermelons.)

Food production is arguably the single most elemental occupation on the planet. It’s no accident 98 percent of the population used to be engaged in agriculture. But as modern technology (notably the internal combustion engine) grew widespread, efficiency increased and more food could be produced by fewer people.

Today the numbers are reversed: A mere 2 percent grow and raise this nation’s food, while the other 98 percent enact legislation to control cow farts and then complain about skyrocketing costs at the grocery store (economics isn’t their strong point).

Interestingly, the ones most dedicated in celebrating Earth Day are often the ones least interested in actually doing the work to acquire this most elemental need. They want others to do the dirty, grimy, bloody work and deliver their food in clean, sanitary, Earth-friendly packaging.

“I think in the United States in general, there’s a disconnect between folks who live in a city and the people who live in the rural communities,” noted one frustrated member of the Siskiyou (Northern California) County Board of Supervisors, who observed the region’s resources are being managed on the basis of politics rather than science. “I don’t think a lot of folks understand where their food comes from, where the raw products come from that support their lives. All they see when they come to the rural counties is what they consider backward people who are doing something on the land that they don’t like to see.”

Getting back to basics like food production might straighten out a great deal of the “green” nonsense, especially in young people. As one annoyed person observed, “Don’t these kids ever work? That is the problem with these idiots. They need to get a job and take care of their own responsibilities … idle hands are the devil’s workshop!”

To which someone responded, “How about they work for their own food – work the land, plant the seeds, nurture the ground, harvest, preserve, take care of the animals and then they will have a better view of the real world. Having things handed to them already prepared will only add to their misunderstanding and feeling of being entitled.”

Of course, there are many “green” people who are, indeed, living up to their ideals. You’ll find them milking cows, harvesting fish, picking blueberries, butchering chickens, grinding corn, scything wheat, baking bread and canning tomatoes. To these people, I raise a glass of homemade wine. You rock. (And you’re probably too tired to protest, much less enact legislation.)

To the rest, I send a great big (organic) raspberry. You’re hypocrites.

So does painting our kitchen green make us a greener family? Of course not. It’s not what color the walls are, it’s what takes place within those walls. The kitchen is where we make cheese from our cows, can our garden produce, create scratch meals, and other daily deeds.

But “green” as these accomplishments may be, activists probably won’t approve. Somehow it’s become unacceptable to live green lifestyle without having a suitably militant red attitude.

I genuinely applaud green living. It’s what we ascribe to do here on our 20-acre homestead. But the green agenda? Of course not. That’s not green (my favorite color). It’s red.

Raw, bloody red.

Media wishing to interview Patrice Lewis, please contact media@wnd.com.



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Recently, we painted two of our kitchen walls a lovely shade of green. Green is my favorite color. I find it soothing, classy, restful, attractive and evocative of the great outdoors.

Does this mean we now live “green”? Let’s find out.

Earth Day, this year on April 22, is an international celebration of the astounding ability of people to ignore laws of economics, physics and common sense in an effort to pretend their carbon footprint is impossibly dainty. On Saturday, participants are invited to expend fossil fuels and widen their environmental impact by traveling to Washington, D.C., for a rally to demonstrate their massive greenness.

Closer to home, enthusiasts can proclaim their commitment to Gaia by coloring their websites or painting their store fronts green. (Apparently that’s all it takes, so perhaps my kitchen walls qualify.) They’ll sell posters and T-shirts and take donations for everything from planting trees to brainwashing children. Retailers will try to convince customers on the greenness of every product on their shelves, regardless of origin or purpose. I believe the term for this mass hysteria is greenwashing.

Hypocrisy abounds during this yearly event, as was comically illustrated in 2015 by Bill Nye (“the science guy“) who famously tweeted his plans to “[head] down to DC to catch an #EarthDay flight on Air Force One tomorrow with the President. We’re going to #ActOnClimate.” (Wow, Bill, way to go.) Oh, and let’s not forget Al Gore, that paragon of ecological virtue, whose carbon footprint makes that of Manhattan look modest.

Earth Day has become a “cynical, bloated, empty-gesture, 24-hour orgy of self-righteous smugness,” in one person’s memorable words. It’s not that green hypocrisy is anything new; it’s just that on Earth Day, it’s so glaringly obvious. It’s no accident green activists are called watermelons: Green on the outside, red on the inside.

Green living and the green agenda are two entirely different things. Green living is sensible, frugal and an admirable personal choice. The green agenda is something else entirely. It is merely socialism prettily wrapped up in 100 percent recycled wrapping paper, with a communist bow on top and backed up by governmental force. Open that green package, and the gory red insides spill out: the blood of hundreds of millions people who have died from collectivist regimes in the last century.

“[T]here is a great tolerance for the ideas of socialism – a system that has caused more deaths and human misery than all other systems combined,” noted the great Walter Williams.

Learn how to achieve a simple lifestyle without “going green” or joining a monastery. Read Patrice Lewis’ helpful book, “The Simplicity Primer: 365 Ideas for Making Life more Livable”

To those of us with a cynical mindset, it seems we hear more about the hypocrisy around Earth Day than we hear of genuine Earth-friendly actions. Putting a new color on a website or marching on Washington is no more “green” than painting my kitchen walls. There’s way too much “talking the talk” and a lot less “walking the walk” when it comes to green living.

Before lobbying for more government regulations to force people into green-powered socialism, I believe Earth Day activists should put their money where their mouths are – literally. If they want to demonstrate their commitment to Gaia, I challenge them to get their hands dirty by growing and raising their own food. (Maybe they should start with watermelons.)

Food production is arguably the single most elemental occupation on the planet. It’s no accident 98 percent of the population used to be engaged in agriculture. But as modern technology (notably the internal combustion engine) grew widespread, efficiency increased and more food could be produced by fewer people.

Today the numbers are reversed: A mere 2 percent grow and raise this nation’s food, while the other 98 percent enact legislation to control cow farts and then complain about skyrocketing costs at the grocery store (economics isn’t their strong point).

Interestingly, the ones most dedicated in celebrating Earth Day are often the ones least interested in actually doing the work to acquire this most elemental need. They want others to do the dirty, grimy, bloody work and deliver their food in clean, sanitary, Earth-friendly packaging.

“I think in the United States in general, there’s a disconnect between folks who live in a city and the people who live in the rural communities,” noted one frustrated member of the Siskiyou (Northern California) County Board of Supervisors, who observed the region’s resources are being managed on the basis of politics rather than science. “I don’t think a lot of folks understand where their food comes from, where the raw products come from that support their lives. All they see when they come to the rural counties is what they consider backward people who are doing something on the land that they don’t like to see.”

Getting back to basics like food production might straighten out a great deal of the “green” nonsense, especially in young people. As one annoyed person observed, “Don’t these kids ever work? That is the problem with these idiots. They need to get a job and take care of their own responsibilities … idle hands are the devil’s workshop!”

To which someone responded, “How about they work for their own food – work the land, plant the seeds, nurture the ground, harvest, preserve, take care of the animals and then they will have a better view of the real world. Having things handed to them already prepared will only add to their misunderstanding and feeling of being entitled.”

Of course, there are many “green” people who are, indeed, living up to their ideals. You’ll find them milking cows, harvesting fish, picking blueberries, butchering chickens, grinding corn, scything wheat, baking bread and canning tomatoes. To these people, I raise a glass of homemade wine. You rock. (And you’re probably too tired to protest, much less enact legislation.)

To the rest, I send a great big (organic) raspberry. You’re hypocrites.

So does painting our kitchen green make us a greener family? Of course not. It’s not what color the walls are, it’s what takes place within those walls. The kitchen is where we make cheese from our cows, can our garden produce, create scratch meals, and other daily deeds.

But “green” as these accomplishments may be, activists probably won’t approve. Somehow it’s become unacceptable to live green lifestyle without having a suitably militant red attitude.

I genuinely applaud green living. It’s what we ascribe to do here on our 20-acre homestead. But the green agenda? Of course not. That’s not green (my favorite color). It’s red.

Raw, bloody red.

Media wishing to interview Patrice Lewis, please contact media@wnd.com.



Click here for reuse options!

Print Print

Article source: http://www.wnd.com/2017/04/want-to-live-green-grow-some-watermelons/


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