Greener BeeGreen TipsFollow Green & Black co-founder’s top tips for a major career change in your 40s — as 70 per cent of workers crave …

SEVENTY per cent of workers in their forties crave a major career change.

A survey by Management Today magazine and Vauxhall Motors found that the fith decade is the time most people shake things up.

 Josephine Fairley made the change herself, co-founding organic chocolate company Green  Blacks after a career as a magazine editor
Josephine Fairley made the change herself, co-founding organic chocolate company Green Black’s after a career as a magazine editor

And Josephine Fairley, 60, knows just how they feel. Back in 1991 she ditched her career as a magazine editor to co-found organic chocolate company Green Black’s — and she recommends taking the leap.

Here she gives her favourite tips for heading in a new direction.

  1. Think about starting your own business. There are still gaps in the market, even if it is just in your area with a type of shop or service.
  2. Buddy up. If you do want your own business, it can really help to team up with someone you trust whose skills complement yours.
  3. Make your hobby pay. You could combine your day job with a passion – anything from baking wedding cakes to gardening.
  4. Acquire a new skill. This can open up new careers.
  5. Will you regret it if you don’t? When I was 16 I bought a postcard of a man on a diving board that said: “If you don’t do it, you’ll never know what would have happened if you had done it.” That slogan has inspired me.
 Research from Management Today found found that 70 per cent of those aged 40 to 49 are looking for 'major change'
Research from Management Today found found that 70 per cent of those aged 40 to 49 are looking for ‘major change’

Shirking beats working

BRITAIN is a procrastination nation, with office workers spending just 3.7 days out of five actually busy.

A survey found employees are spending more than two hours a day shirking work duties.

 A survey found that employees are spending more than two hours shirking work every day
A survey found that employees are spending more than two hours shirking work every day

Social media was the most used medium of distraction, with office workers spending 37 minutes looking at Facebook and Twitter daily.

Employees spend an extra 25 minutes chatting with their colleagues – then more time during lunch breaks.

Staff are also spending 15 minutes making coffee and 12 minutes in the toilet each day.

Some of the activities listed in the poll are a necessary part of the working day – but 62 per cent admit to carrying out these office rituals purely due to boredom.

Shai Ahorony, of marketing firm rebootonline.com, which carried out the survey, said: “Some off-time could have a beneficial effect on productivity, but it does need to be kept under control.

“If staff members are found to abuse the freedom they are given, this matter needs to be brought up with them.”

 Social media has been identified as the biggest reason for employees not doing their work
Social media has been identified as the biggest reason for employees not doing their work

Tech skill is No1

HIRING staff with the right technological ability is the biggest challenge faced by employers in today’s rapidly changing workplace.

Innovation consultancy Happen asked CEOs to name the most important skills for future innovation and top of the list was an understanding of technology – in particular artificial intelligence.

 CEOs are struggling to find candidates with the technological skills that they are looking for
CEOs are struggling to find candidates with the technological skills that they are looking for

This was followed by better commercial understanding and digital marketing skills.

Costas Papaikonomou, of Happen, said: “Technology advances are inevitable in today’s world and businesses are constantly experimenting with new tools and programmes in the workplace.

“Our study proves that a grasp of this is a highly desired skill.”

Alice has McDone it

A SCHEME that has guided more than 800 youngsters into work since 2014 has 328 new places up for grabs.

The six-week Get a Job programme gives young people key skills so they can enter education, training or employment.

 Get a Job has helped 801 young people, including Alice, enter education, training or employment by providing them with key skills
Get a Job has helped 801 young people, including Alice, enter education, training or employment by providing them with key skills

Alice Aspey works at a branch of McDonald’s­ after completing the scheme’s employability course.

She had spent four years studying hairdressing but found it difficult to find permanent work due to low confidence.

As Alice’s self-belief grew, she was offered work experience at McDonald’s – and in June was taken on full-time as a crew member at one of the chain’s restaurants in Wigan.

Alice, 21, said: “I put all my effort into it and I’m happy that I have been offered a job as a result.”

Flirting nine to five

OFFICE workers are mixing business and pleasure – as one in four workers flirt with colleagues despite already being in relationships.

But the study by law firm First4Lawyers also found that 20 per cent of women consider flirting with a colleague to be cheating.

 Lawyers have called for employers to make rules stricter regarding workplace romances thrugh policies which consider the behaviour unacceptable
Lawyers have called for employers to make rules stricter regarding workplace romances thrugh policies which consider the behaviour unacceptable

People aged 18 to 24 have the highest expectations of their partners, the research found. Among them, 28 per cent consider flirting with a colleague as unfaithful, versus just 12 per cent of over-55s.

But the older age group are more likely to leave their partner because of sexual infidelity – 70 per cent would go, versus 60 per cent of younger people.

Andrew Cullwick, of First4lawyers, said: “It is no surprise that spending 40 hours a week in close proximity to our colleagues often leads to office relationships.

“But romances are often doomed, especially when a married party is involved, which leads to conflict outside and within the workplace.

“HR departments need to ensure companies have some control over workplace romances, ideally through policies and guidelines which determine the behaviours deemed acceptable.”

Article source: https://www.thesun.co.uk/money/4417382/career-crossroads-for-over-forties-advice/


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